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Recent Posts

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1
Antique Bulb Discussion / Re: Found a light bulb while digging
« Last post by adam2 on January 20, 2021, 11:49:35 am »
Here is a similar product for sale today on fleabay.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/6x-1-2V-Lens-Ended-torch-Bulb-MES-E10-200mA-0-2A-1-cell-1-5v-0-24W-lamp/392752297690?hash=item5b71dc76da:g:rzUAAOSwGmtei3x6

No specific recommendation is made regarding the above link which is provided to show the continuing ready availability of similar lamps.
2
Antique Bulb Discussion / Re: Found a light bulb while digging
« Last post by adam2 on January 20, 2021, 11:45:12 am »
Agree, a flashlight bulb and almost certainly 1.2 volts or thereabouts. Other voltages exist, but the example illustrated looks to be 1.2 volt due to the filament being a single wire not looped or coiled.

Still made today AFAIK, certainly still available.
3
I doubt that it is a simple on/off switch as such a fitment would normally be built into the lamp holder or be part of the fixed installation.

One possibility is that the lamp contains two filaments of very different outputs. One dim for economical night lighting in say a sick room, or in a toilet, the other being much brighter for general use.

Another possibility is that the lamp contains two similar filaments, with the intention that when one filament burns out that the second filament may be used. The idea being that a twin filament bulb gave twice the life for less than twice the cost.
Never popular because they did cost almost twice as much as two standard bulbs, and the glass bulb was blackened to a greater degree and output on the second filament thereby reduced.
4
Hi - I've tried googling every which way - but can't seem to find another example to help explain what this toggle is.
Thanks for any assistance!

Dave
5
Antique Bulb Discussion / Re: Found a light bulb while digging
« Last post by Yulelights76 on January 16, 2021, 08:34:20 am »
Mackloti
Your bulb is likely a #112 flashlight bulb rated 1.2 volts, 0.22 amps. The bulb was intended for a one cell penlight, and has a small lens on the end to focus the light into a narrow beam. I Fact, the filament appears intact so it might even work! They were made in other voltages as well. Those pre focused bulbs date to the 1980s or earlier.

Here is a link to the bulb from a web seller that specializes in discontinued bulbs. https://www.replacementlightbulbs.com/lamp112.html

That gives a whole new meaning to growing BULBS in your garden! (Sorry I couldn't resist)
J.S.P.
6
Antique Bulb Discussion / Found a light bulb while digging
« Last post by Mackloti on January 15, 2021, 07:55:45 am »
I was digging in my yard yesterday and found a tiny lightbulb buried in the ground. Can someone help me with dating it? It's about an inch long or so.
7
Christmas Lighting / Matchless Star Tree Topper Re-bulbing Service
« Last post by zozman on January 09, 2021, 09:58:01 am »
Arguably, the rarest Christmas light-up ornament is the Matchless Star Tree Topper. Made by the Matchless Company Chicago, Illinois from 1939-1941, it was a miniature C-6 base series lamp illuminated star to complement the individual single and double row Matchless (Wonder Star) lights on Christmas trees. The star (Series 300) was made from Czech cut crystal which was imported to the United States for assembly. Germany occupation of the Baltics leading up to WWII stopped all imports of the crystal.

History has it only 50 of these ornaments are known to exist. I own several over the years and have never had a bulb burn out. The key is to reduce wattage and run a dimmer when starting the lamp and gradually increase it until 80% electrical draw is established. The biggest detriment to an incandescent lamp is the initial turning on electrical draw. What kills them or reduces their longevity is constant on-off cycles. So. I wondered, if my star burned out, how would I re-light it?

I have the answer. I made a replacement bulb with the same characteristics of the original. I took a Matchless Star Tree Topper and de-engineered it.

The clear globe bulb itself sits atop a 1-1/4" bakelite stand with a brass C-6 base glued to the bottom. The bulb has leads soldered to the brass base.

I was able to manufacture the complete bulb harness which fit into the Bakelite stand.

Below are pictures of the tree topper and the replacement bulb.

Randy Pozzi

zozman50@hotmail.com










zoz 01/09/21





8
Christmas Lighting / Re: Replacement bulb for Matchless Stars
« Last post by zozman on January 05, 2021, 08:52:02 am »
Update: 01/05/21

The best bulb for re-lamping a vintage old C-6 100-500-700 series Matchless Star is the GE640 bulb which was last produced over 60 years ago. They are available on eBay ever so often. Stay away from China long shank nickle based bulbs or square flat top bulbs as they burn too hot and do not have longevity.


zoz


9
Christmas Lighting / Re: Large Matchless Star
« Last post by zozman on November 30, 2020, 03:53:09 pm »
Update 11/30/20

This is an update to previous information I posted regarding relamping the large 900 series Matchless Stars. I had the original bulbs reproduced in the exacting physical and electrical specifications. No one in the United States had anything remotely similar to the original Matchless Star bulb. I can sell you the bulbs with instructions how to do the bulb replacement or I can do it for you. The bulbs are sold on eBay under seller drfusion.

I have posted some pictures.

Randy






11/30/20








10
Antique Bulb Discussion / Harvey Hubbell Inc switch and bulb combination
« Last post by NorthwestElectric on October 19, 2020, 09:48:58 am »
Greetings! 

I had an antique dealer/friend bring me a bulb that I've never seen before and I'm having trouble finding anything about it on the net.  It looks to be a remote switched 3-way carbon filament bulb.  One of the filaments is unfortunately broken, the other is intact.  The wires on the bulb socket snap off like buttons.  The switch lists Harvey Hubbel Inc  "May 8, 00"  1/2A, 125V

Really neat looking bulb, does anyone here know any information about it?

Thank you in advance!!

Scott

https://www.dropbox.com/s/p8nhrt14bl160r2/20201019_082803.jpg?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ersbxu43uospokh/20201019_082744.jpg?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cmzsbalwkhul8e5/20201019_082726.jpg?dl=0
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