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Author Topic: 4 new lighting technologies  (Read 3149 times)

Offline Anders Hoveland

  • Jr. Member
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  • Posts: 21
4 new lighting technologies
« on: September 05, 2013, 05:23:33 pm »
LED is not the only new lighting technology. Expect to see these plasma lamps appear in parking lots, athletic fields, and large indoor public spaces.

http://sound.westhost.com/lamps/sp-lamp.html
http://www.plasmabright.com/psh0731b.asp#
http://lightdesign.net.au/wp/index.php/luxims-light-emitting-plasma/
http://www.luxim.com/


Electroluminescent panels are becoming popular in some night clubs and certain high end architectural designs. One potential advantage is that they can provide a pleasant broadband distribution of frequencies in the blue portion of the color spectrum (in contrast, the blue light from current LED technology is just a single frequency, and can be a little harsh and purplish)   



Unfortunately, current electroluminescent technology has low intensity of light, so it has mostly only been used for decorative purposes, but that could soon change.

These organic semiconductor polymer strips could eventually replace fluorescent lighting. They have a much better quality of light, and are comparable in efficiency to current LEDs. They contain multi-walled carbon nanotubes and operate best on 80 kHz frequency current.
http://www.architectmagazine.com/leds/nano-engineered-polymers-simulate-sunlight.aspx
http://www.gizmag.com/fipel-alternative-fluorescent-lights/25287/
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1566119912004831

ESL technology operates similar to the old cathode ray TV tubes. Supposedly it can give off a softer more pleasing white light than LED can.
http://www.vu1corporation.com/