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Author Topic: Clear Flame Bulbs - When Produced?  (Read 2665 times)

Offline lunor

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Clear Flame Bulbs - When Produced?
« on: December 14, 2012, 12:02:06 pm »
Question: When were clear, sculptured flame bulbs of the type attached here first produced? They appear in the Sears catalog by 1937, with only 25 watts, and by 1951, with 40 watts, but I want to know when the clear version were first manufactured.  I'm trying to verify if they existed in 1926; I know shaded flame bulbs of this shape in amber or ivory were around then but I need to know about the clear version.  Thanks. :-)

Offline Tim

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Re: Clear Flame Bulbs - When Produced?
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2012, 09:54:14 am »
I don't have enough catalogs from the 1930s onward to provide the answer to your question.  I can only say that this particular style of molded Flame bulb was likely introduced during the late 1920s based on what I could find in my records.  If someone reading this has access to General Electric or Westinghouse lighting catalogs from the late 1920s then they may be able to provide a better answer.

Offline lunor

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Re: Clear Flame Bulbs - When Produced?
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2012, 11:39:15 am »
Yes, I want information from the '20s - particularly by 1926. Only one example - if clear - will do it. Also wonder if anyone produced one with wattage of 40 or greater before 1951.