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Author Topic: Please tell me about my Sunbeam bulb  (Read 2206 times)

Offline lushvineyard

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Please tell me about my Sunbeam bulb
« on: December 28, 2009, 12:49:40 pm »
Greetings,
    Yesterday we were in the basement looking through my Dad's 80 year collection of interesting stuff, and my husband picked up an light bulb sitting on the tool box. He assured my that it was very unusual and old, but I didn't really believe him until I tried to find out more online. I have found pictures of similar ones made in the early 1890s, but would like to know more about my bulb, and if possible, an estimate of its value.
    The bulb is made of clear glass, with the exposed portion of the glass being about 3" tall. The bulb has a glass point at the tip. It has a Westinghouse base, made of brass, or similar metal. The filament is intact, and is attached to a glass base. The filament goes up, loops once, and returns of the base.
    The bulb is in unused condition, and has a paper label which says:
110v  4c. p
SUNBEAM
    It is in pristine condition except for a smear of dirt or grease on one side, and some spider poo on the other. I'm not sure whether or how I should clear it. For now it is in an Imari soba bowl in the china cupboard.
Thanks, Mylrea