research
 Patents
 Books
 Literature
 Articles
 Timeline
 Auction Archive

about
 About this site
 Wanted to buy

bulb gallery

Incandescent:
C
carbon
WD
drawn tungsten
WC
coiled tungsten
WM
mini tungsten
WS
pressed tung.
FG
figural bulbs
XL
christmas
XS
christmas sets
T
tantalum

Discharge:
NE
neon lamps
AR
argon lamps
XE
xenon lamps
MA
mercury
MC
fluorescent
MS
special mercury

Hardware:
F
fuses
FX
fixtures
PF
plugs & fittings
SA
sockets
SW
switches

tube gallery

 X-ray
 Geissler
 Crookes
 Radio
 Box art

museum pics

 Dr. Hugh Hicks
 
Fort Myers, FL.
 S.Slabyhoudek

links

 Related links
 Submit a link

 

Author Topic: blue 1000watt metal halide  (Read 13210 times)

Offline chris62

  • New Member!
  • *
  • Posts: 4
blue 1000watt metal halide
« on: December 26, 2005, 07:51:55 am »
I have to admit Im not a lamp collector but am doing research into the becquerel daguerreotype
photographic process.

The plates are 10,000 times less sensitive than modern film and only sensitive to
blue violet and ultr-violet light and I have been looking for the most cost effective
way to produce heck of a lot of blue light.
I have been using 2 400 watt blue metal halides one from venture one from BLV
with knock up home made reflectors.
at the time I just couldnt get two venture ones they seem to be the better blue.
Now I want to up the lumens and I know Venture do a 1000watt blue lamp but what
kind of ballast and fitting would I need?

At the moment I have a ballast that is marketed to be used for hydroponics and
called powerplant.
Hope some one can help 

Offline Mónico González

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 146
  • Philips HP-80w Mercury Lamp
    • Mis Bombillas, peque?o museo virtual de la l?mpara el?ctrica.
Re: blue 1000watt metal halide
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2005, 08:01:53 pm »
Don't you thing that clear high pressure mercury lamps would give more UV output than metal-halide ones for a given input power?
As a photographer, I've used many times a single Philips HP125 watts reflector lamp to sucessfully expose silkscreen emulsions, which are noticeably low sensitive.
Mercury lamps are many times cheaper than its MH counterparts, as well as they no needs the use of external starting devices, only the series wired inductive ballast for the adequate power.
Best regards.
M. Gonz?lez.

Offline chris62

  • New Member!
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: blue 1000watt metal halide
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2005, 02:20:24 pm »
You maywell be correct but I have to make very many tests because of the difficulty
of the process and didnt want to expose myself to more uv than necessary so prefer
blue.
But if there are any other options for high blue output please do inform my. You
lot are more knowledgable than me.

But I must say Im beginning to find visual liking for metal halides, theres something about them
they have a quality.

Offline Mónico González

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 146
  • Philips HP-80w Mercury Lamp
    • Mis Bombillas, peque?o museo virtual de la l?mpara el?ctrica.
Re: blue 1000watt metal halide
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2005, 06:28:58 pm »
Don't worry about dangerous exposure at UV when use clear mercury lamps, because standard high pressure ones has an outer glass bulb that stops all wavelenghts below 3500 Angstroms, so, the strongest spectral line radiated by such lamps in the UV region are the "i" mercury line at 3650 Angstroms, precisely the same that are used as "black light" for stage special effects, disco and other decorative uses as fluorescency exciter, withouth any adverse effects over skin and eyes, but very efficient as actinic light for photographic and photomechanic emulsion exposure.
In any case, try to avoid to look directly to the arc tube of one of these lamps for any longer than a few seconds, not so by the long wave UV emitted, but for the intense brilliance of the light source itself.
Keep in mind that these lamps are created for general industrial indoor and outdoor lighting purpose, so they are fitted with the external jacket that fills two main purposes: to isolate from atmosphere and protect the arc tube and to avoid the emission of the dangerous 2537 Angstroms UV wavelenght.
Best regards.
M. Gonz?lez.

Offline chris62

  • New Member!
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: blue 1000watt metal halide
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2005, 01:16:22 pm »
Okey what HPM lamps would you suggest I do tests with? Dont get to technical now !

Offline Mónico González

  • Hero Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 146
  • Philips HP-80w Mercury Lamp
    • Mis Bombillas, peque?o museo virtual de la l?mpara el?ctrica.
Re: blue 1000watt metal halide
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2006, 06:49:58 pm »
Happy New Year, Chris!

Owing the fact that Tim's server have been temporarily out of service, here are those info about you asked me.
It?s too difficult try to explain you these things being a bit less technical, but lets go ahead!

First at all I would need to know what a kind of task are you thinking about: contact reproduction onto copper
daguerreotype plates from inter-positive film "clises" taken in the usual way or instead the direct exposure of
the copper plate using a genuine big size camera to take the picture of a real subject (like a portrait).
In the first case, a simple "insolating" press or reproduction device fitted with a single HPR-125W, mounted at
rough 75cm,(plus or minus 29 to 30") over the glass of the press, could give you a reasonably useful service
without excessive long exposure times.
But in the other hand, if you are planning to lighting a real subject (anyone that "patiently" would wait
absolutely still during several minutes (a sort of "cobaya" or "Guinea pig" :-)), you will need some more power, let's say 2 x 400 watts to begin, using simple and cheap aluminium reflectors.
Clear HPM lamps are not too easy-to-find nowadays, at least here in Europe (I bought a hugue quantity of them, 80 and 125 watts rated, in last year and I did must order them from Australia via a Spanish dealer) but for
these power ranges (400 w and more) perhaps could be easier to get them, owing to the fact that this kind of
bulbs are still in use for graphic arts reproduction machines and "insolators" for making printed circuit
boards.
I must say you that I haven't any kind of practical experience about making daguerreotypes, but according those I've studied, I do realize that such a primitive photographic processes were known as being too less sensitive, so they needed very long time exposures even at direct Sunlight to get a useful image with enough density and contrast.
In any case, you must acquire enough experience to get the exact exposure combination of time Vs. lens aperture to obtain well exposed plates and a reasonably wide field depth, by making some tests.
BTW, the daguerreotype process are known as being a slightly hazardous process, due to the fact that mercury
vapour (not precisely these within the lamp's discharge tubes ;-)) are involved in development process itself,
so, please be careful to avoid any intoxication when working with such plates.
Also you must to weight up the advantages or misadvantages of needing to buy new ballasts as well as new mercury lamps.

Please, let us to see and enjoy some samples of your daguerreotypes when you will get them. Thanks.

Sucess and best regards.
M. Gonz?lez.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2006, 06:57:48 pm by M?nico Gonz?lez »

Offline chris62

  • New Member!
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: blue 1000watt metal halide
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2006, 09:26:08 am »
Just to explain a daguerreotype.(first commercial form of photography Paris1839) 
A copper or brass plate is highly polished and then electro-plated
with silver, this is then exposed to the vapours of iodine which combine
with the silver to produce silver iodide which is light sensitive. The plate
is then placed into a camera and exposed, there are then two ways to
 develop the plate, either mercury vapour is used or red light, I use red
light, this is called the becquerel method after Edmond Becquerel. The
plate is then fixed in hypo and gilded in gold chloride washed and dryed
with a hair dryer and placed into a mount.

I have already made daguerreotypes and will post one when I have jpegs.
 My frustration is that the exposed times are toooo long this causes
many problems hence the need for a powerful light source.

I do not use the mercury method of development because of the health hazard
and the need for a professional fume hood which is too costly. With the mercury
method  bromine vapour can be used as an accelorator (much more sensitive to light)
 when the plate is  sensitised, sadly this method does not work when the
 plate is developed with red light so the plate is very unsensitive.