research
 Patents
 Books
 Literature
 Articles
 Timeline
 Auction Archive

about
 About this site
 Wanted to buy

bulb gallery

Incandescent:
C
carbon
WD
drawn tungsten
WC
coiled tungsten
WM
mini tungsten
WS
pressed tung.
FG
figural bulbs
XL
christmas
XS
christmas sets
T
tantalum

Discharge:
NE
neon lamps
AR
argon lamps
XE
xenon lamps
MA
mercury
MC
fluorescent
MS
special mercury

Hardware:
F
fuses
FX
fixtures
PF
plugs & fittings
SA
sockets
SW
switches

tube gallery

 X-ray
 Geissler
 Crookes
 Radio
 Box art

museum pics

 Dr. Hugh Hicks
 
Fort Myers, FL.
 S.Slabyhoudek

links

 Related links
 Submit a link

 

Author Topic: 1953 coronation lightbulb  (Read 3312 times)

Offline laurapr

  • New Member!
  • *
  • Posts: 1
1953 coronation lightbulb
« on: February 22, 2013, 07:17:01 pm »
I have a 1953 coronation lightbulb. I would really like to know how to test it. It has an english fitting. I last tested it in England about ten years ago, it woked beautifully then. Could anyone help me?

Offline Howard

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 34
Re: 1953 coronation lightbulb
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 08:24:52 pm »
I have a 1953 coronation lightbulb. I would really like to know how to test it. It has an english fitting. I last tested it in England about ten years ago, it woked beautifully then. Could anyone help me?

A lovely item!  These were made in two versions, for burning cap down, like yours, or cap up, with the innards inverted.
What you need in simplest form is a E27 (American medium screw) to B22d (British bayonet cap) adaptor.  These can be readily found on eBay - try item no. 330742708753  http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330742708753?var=540065879439&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649 as an example, the seller will ship to USA.  If you're lucky, that's all you'll need if your lamp will strike on 120 volts.  It won't be as bright as on 240 volts, and may take longer for the glow to spread all over the electrodes. (This can happen to a neon glow lamp which has been unused for a long period.)  If you're unlucky, and the lamp doesn't strike, you'll need to find a source of 200 - 240 volts ac.  Please be very careful if using the 240 volt supply for high power appliances in your house.  Make sure the insulation on any wiring you use is suitable for the higher voltage.  Most of the rest of the world uses ~230 volts for everything ,so we're used to it...  Good luck!  Hve fun!
--
Regards, Howard.
"Is there any tea on this ship?" - Arthur Dent