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Recent Posts

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1
Thank you.
2
Looks like a gu10 line voltage halogen lamp.
120 volt lamps in the USA or 230 volts in Europe.
Buy one and try it. They commonly come in 35 watt and in 50 watts, best to stick to the lower wattage if the maximum wattage of the fixture is unknown.
They are widely available and not expensive.
Many vendors offer LED equivalents, these save significant electricity, but cost more to buy.
3
Hello!

If you're still selling GE AR1 / W1A I'd like to buy 10.  Please message back ASAP!  Thanks.

-Elizabeth
4
Antique Bulb Discussion / August 2018 Early Electric Lighting Collectors Meet
« Last post by cmshapiro on July 04, 2018, 04:17:34 pm »
A little last minute posting this here but any last minute interest, we are about 6 weeks away! Please contact me for more info.

  Chad
5
I moved into an apartment and the landlord (who lives out of state) did not have bulbs in all the fixtures.  Attached is a picture of the socket for the bulb.  Anyone have any idea what type of bulb I need to buy?  I would just take the picture to Home Depot of Lowes but they are not very convenient.
6
Looks like a decorative type as opposed to a Christmas lamp, based on the size of the globe relative to the miniature base.  Neat little bulb!  I have no idea who made it, but there may be a stamp on the screw base that could provide a clue, but that base looks pretty rough.
7
Antique Bulb Discussion / Help identifying curious globular light bulb, circa 1911?
« Last post by cdy on June 25, 2018, 12:55:07 am »



I was wondering if anyone here could identify the maker and type of this light bulb. It was found alongside a tarantula filament Edison Mazda light bulb and a few other other artifacts from around the year 1911. I'm not familiar with antique light bulbs, but I thought the globular shape and absent base were peculiar.
8
Antique Bulb Discussion / (Rare?) Westinghouse Mazda Blue Light Bulb
« Last post by Kefo on June 24, 2018, 06:48:42 pm »
Hello all,

I have recently acquired a large box containing many dark blue light bulbs. They are made by Westinghouse Mazda, rated at 25 Watts and quite unusual to me. I have searched quite thoroughly but couldn't find a match on the internet. They also came with an old quality control certificate (see image).

I was wondering if anybody had a clue as to what these might be used for? I saw some with a more cylindrical shape that appeared to be used for a sign of some kind but I am not sure if that is actually what these would have been used for.

Any clues would be appreciated!

Thanks for your time,

Kefo

9
Modern Electric Lighting / Are there bulb sockets with a rechargeable battery?
« Last post by techniker on June 21, 2018, 10:26:59 am »
Thanks a lot
10
General Discussion / Re: 4v 0.75a osram small edison screw bulbs
« Last post by adam2 on June 17, 2018, 05:37:25 pm »
Quite possibly a bulb for a miners cap lamp, but two other possibilities occur to me.
Firstly, perhaps an exciter lamp for a movie film projector, not of course to project the image but for sound reproduction. Many movie films had an optical sound track, through which light from a small lamp was passed and partially obscured before being detected by a photocell and amplified to produce the audio signal. To avoid any mains hum being superimposed on the audio, exciter lamps were usually operated at high frequency from a valve oscillator, this being simpler than producing smooth DC.

Alternatively it might be a lamp for lighting a microscope or a reflecting galvanometer. Such instruments often used odd lamps, I suspect to stop people using cheap torch bulbs or vehicle bulbs.
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